End-to-end Software Development with Team Foundation Server 2015

Team Foundation Server 2015 helps teams communicate and work together to deliver quality software. This course will teach you how to work effectively with TFS 2015's features such as Agile planning, version control, build automation, testing, and more.
Course info
Rating
(53)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 9, 2016
Duration
4h 26m
Table of contents
Introduction
Understanding the Feature Path from TFS 2013
Installing and Configuring TFS 2015
Working with New Kanban Board Features
Working with New Version Control Features
Building Software
Testing Software
Integrating with TFS 2015
Description
Course info
Rating
(53)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
May 9, 2016
Duration
4h 26m
Description

Building and delivering quality software requires teams to collaborate and to have a way to easily communicate with each other. This course, End-to-end Software Development with Team Foundation Server 2015, will introduce you to Team Foundation Server and show you how you can use the great Agile tools found in TFS to keep track of your team and easily collaborate together. As you move through the course, you will learn about TFS's version control capabilities, both with centralized version control and with Git. By keeping your code and work assignments in a single tool, you are able to create associations and be aware of dependencies. You'll also learn how you can benefit from using TFS 2015's very powerful build system, discovering how to build applications using multiple technologies. Finally, you'll learn about TFS's great tools and how they can help you manage and run test cases, analyze results, and provide feedback to the rest of the team along with images and video of any issues found during testing. When you are finished with this course, you will have a very strong understanding of TFS 2015, which will help you use its tools in order to deliver quality software.

About the author
About the author

Microsoft Visual Studio ALM MVP, ALM Ranger, Telerik Insider, and president of the Orlando .NET User Group (ONETUG). He is passionate about Scrum and continuous improvement using Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Understanding the Feature Path from TFS 2013
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. Starting with TFS 2012, Microsoft changed the release cadence to more frequent releases. These releases are done as updates, which include new features along with bug fixes. A lot of organizations stayed with the RTM version, which is the initial release of TFS. During this module, I will cover the changes that were introduced with TFS 2013 updates. This will help you get ready for the rest of the course, which will focus on TFS 2015 RTM and Update 1.

Installing and Configuring TFS 2015
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. This module shows you how to transition from TFS 2013 to TFS 2015. You're going to learn about the different options that you have when installing TFS 2015. If you're upgrading from TFS 2013 and you have a large data set, you may want to take a look at a pre-upgrade process that will reduce your down time. I'm going to take you through the upgrade process on a single server.

Working with New Kanban Board Features
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. This module covers the updates made to the Agile functionality in TFS including Kanban board features. Microsoft made a big investment in our ability to track work at multiple levels creating our hierarchies and providing feedback all the way up the chain. Across all levels of your portfolio, you're able to use a Kanban board to move your work across states and have a way for you and your team to collaborate on an interactive board. Of course, every team is different, and you will want to customize your board. So I will cover the ways that you can make your Kanban boards work great for your team. TFS 2015 also brought us enhancements to the way that we manage our product backlog. These improvements make your ability to work with and find data a lot more efficient, and in conjunction with productivity tools, you will find that the TFS web portal has become the best place to plan your product and get insights into your team's upcoming work. Once we know what we're building, it is time for us to break down our work into sprints or iterations. I will cover the sprint backlog, board and capacity planning features, and talk about ways for your team to see and track progress. All the information that is tracked within TFS can be accessed from the dashboards. I will show you the new dashboard functionality and how to make your data easily accessible and organized.

Working with New Version Control Features
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. This module covers new version control features in TFS 2015. TFS 2013 introduced Git as a version control option when creating a new team project. TFS 2015 continues to make some great strides with its Git functionality giving developers the ability to pick between either Team Foundation Version Control or Git depending on what works best for your teams. Starting with TFS 2015 Update 1, you're no longer limited to either Git or TFVC in a team project. You're now able to have two different types of repositories within a single team project. In addition to that, Microsoft made some enhancements to functionality on the Git side to give Git users the essential features needed to be effective. This doesn't just include core Git functionality but also usability features to get to our data and understand version control history. As you start using Git and understanding the power of branching, TFS gives you the ability to apply and enforce policies to keep your repositories in good shape and encourage the team to work together following best practices. Now, as great as it is to use an IDE or even Notepad, sometimes we want to be able to make code changes quickly right from the browser, and you're now able to do so with TFS 2015 whether you use Git or Team Foundation Version Control.

Building Software
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. This module covers the new build system that was introduced in TFS 2015 and how to take advantage of the new capabilities. Team Foundation Server has included a build system since its original release. We went from being able to build XML-based MS build scripts that was replaced by XAML-based workflow templates. And now TFS 2015 introduced a new build system with a new web-based interface and a much more flexible infrastructure that includes build agents, pools, and queues. If you upgraded from TFS 2013, and you have existing XAML-based builds, they are supported in TFS 2015. But as you create new builds, they should be created with the new build system. If you want to get an in-depth introduction to the build system, check out my course titled First Look: TFS Build 2015. We're going to start by installing and configuring the new build agent service. I will then show you how to create a build definition from your browser and run the build. We will go over build definition and customization where you will be able to see the new build tasks that let you build cross-platform applications out of the box. I will then show you how to customize your build definitions farther and show you how to keep track of changes with build history. And we're going to wrap up this module by creating templates so that your team can be more effective with the new build system.

Testing Software
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. This module covers testing features in TFS 2015. Prior to TFS 2013, Microsoft kept manual testing functionality in Microsoft Test Manager, which is a separate test client for Team Foundation Server. TFS 2015 still includes MTM, but you'll find that a lot of MTM functionality and also new functionality is now found on the browser. When you access the Test hub in TFS 2015 web portal, you're able to plan, test, and analyze your team's testing efforts. As your test team goes through their test plan, it is very likely that they will want to do some exploratory testing, which will allow them to test application without following a script. As a tester gathers exploratory testing results, they are able to access results and any associated artifacts from the Test hub. Earlier, we looked at the Kanban board, and you will take a look at functionality that is currently on the online version of TFS, which is Visual Studio Team Services, where you will see how you can plan for your test efforts right from the Kanban board. This module will show you how test functionality that was previously only found in Microsoft Test Manager can now be accessed directly on the TFS web portal. For an in-depth look at the testing concepts covered, you should watch my Pluralsight course on Microsoft Test Manager.

Integrating with TFS 2015
Hello! This is Esteban Garcia with Pluralsight. This module shows you how to extend TFS by accessing and enabling third-party components to interact with the system. One of the easiest ways to extend TFS functionality is through the Visual Studio marketplace. The marketplace includes extensions published by Microsoft and third parties that extend the built-in TFS functionality. I will show you how to enable these extensions in TFS and how to create your own extensions. If you want to consume TFS data and make modifications to your own tools, you will want to take a look at the TFS REST APIs. They are a lightweight way to work with TFS. You can access most of TFS data such as work items, builds, source code and more. And in some cases, rather than pulling TFS for information, you want TFS to notify your application when an event occurs. TFS 2015 includes the ability to subscribe to service hooks and get notification when an action is performed. I will show you how to create and work with service hooks to help your team collaborate together.