Basic Administration of SharePoint 2016

SharePoint 2016 provides collaboration for organizations of all sizes. This course will teach you the basics of deploying SharePoint 2016, including configuring web apps, site collections, and more.
Course info
Rating
(17)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 7, 2017
Duration
1h 43m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Introducing SharePoint 2016 Basic Administration
Creating and Configuring Web Applications
Creating and Configuring Site Collections and Sites
Creating and Configuring Service Applications
Managing Users and Permissions
Recapping the Journey
Description
Course info
Rating
(17)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 7, 2017
Duration
1h 43m
Description

SharePoint adoption is increasing rapidly on premises and in the cloud. Don't get left behind, because no matter your current skill set or IT interests, there are one or more areas of SharePoint to build your career around. In this course, Basic Administration of SharePoint 2016, you'll learn to configure and deploy SharePoint. First, you'll delve into SharePoint farm architecture basics. Next, you'll explore the creation and configuration of web applications. Finally, you'll learn how to create site collections and sites, and what you can do with them. By the end of this course, you'll know how to set up SharePoint in a small test environment and be ready to move that farm to a limited production environment.

About the author
About the author

Mark has trained and / or consulted in 20 countries since 1999, after retooling himself as an IT admin in the Windows NT 4.0 era at a local college. He has taught students at various Microsoft and Symantec campuses and at a variety of academic, military, corporate, and training center locations as well as online. He is the lead singer in three rock bands he founded, sings jazz, does voice overs, and has dabbled in stand-up and improv.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Mark Ingram, and welcome to my course, SharePoint 2016, Basic Administration. I'm a consultant, trainer, and author at CrystalClear. SharePoint adoption is increasing rapidly on premises and in the cloud. Don't get left behind because no matter your current skillset or IT interests, there are one or more areas of SharePoint to build your career around. In this course, we're going to configure a test environment to get to know SharePoint 2016 from a junior farm administrator's perspective. Some of the major topics that we will cover include SharePoint farm architecture basics, creation and configuration of web applications, creation of site collections and sites, and what you can do with them, and managing users and permissions. By the end of this course, you'll know how to set up SharePoint in a small test environment, and be ready to move that farm to a limited production environment for further testing and trials with a small group of test users. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with Windows administration basics. No previous SharePoint experience is required. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn the fundamentals of SharePoint farm administration with the SharePoint 2016 Basic Administration course at Pluralsight.

Introducing SharePoint 2016 Basic Administration
Welcome to Pluralsight. I'm Mark Ingram, and this is SharePoint 2016, Basic Administration. Have you been thrown into the deep end with SharePoint 2016, and don't know where to start? Fear Not. Let's say you started your job a month ago, and your company has acquired SharePoint licenses, all the governance and planning work has been done. Your colleague, who was going to implement SharePoint 2016 has been poached by a competitor, so now you have been tasked with administering SharePoint 2016 in a test environment. Your boss is aware that although SharePoint can do many things, trying to do too many of those things at once is a recipe for a failed SharePoint deployment, so you're going to start with a basic deployment in a test environment, and by the end of the course, you'll be ready to port that environment over to a small production environment for further testing.

Creating and Configuring Web Applications
Let's talk Creating and Configuring Web Apps, starting with positioning web apps in the context of other SharePoint farm elements, and I'll show you how to create and configure a web app from Central Administration, and also how to script that process using the SharePoint Management Shell. So let's explore the farm relationships. Everything in your SharePoint deployment exists within a single farm. You could, at some point, expand that to a multi-farm relationship, but to keep things simple, we're going to include everything in a single farm. Within our farm environment, we need one or more web apps. A couple of them are created automatically during farm installation, we generally want to create additional web apps in order to segment and organize our SharePoint content for our end users. Once we've created a web app, within that, then we can create site collections, and sites, and other elements, which users interact with, for example, the ability to upload documents, and form teams, project sites, and more. As the previous slide implied, we cannot simply create a site collection by itself, it must be created inside of a web application. When your colleague installed the farm, a couple of web applications were installed automatically. One of them is designed to host the all-important Central Administration website, that should live by itself in the web application, and not have regular user content hosted alongside. No, we want to create a separate web application, probably multiple separate web applications to host a variety of site collections in our farm environment, so we need to know how to create a web application, and what settings to configure.

Creating and Configuring Site Collections and Sites
Now that we've created web applications, which allows for the creation of SharePoint content, now we can move on to creating site collections and sites. First we'll create a top-level site collection. In that process, we'll look at some of the templates and where to find the other templates, as well as some other options pertaining to quotas and secondary administrators. Then we'll create subsites underneath the top-level site, and look at some of the other options. There are so many, we're not going to cover them all, but you'll know the general categories and where to look for and find additional options. First let's revisit the SharePoint farm relationships. So the entirety of a typical SharePoint deployment is the farm. Now there are some circumstances where you'd want a multi-farm environment, but to keep it simple, we're going to keep everything within a single farm for this course. Within the farm we have one or more web apps, typically two or more. Think of a web app like an IIS site on steroids. The functionality has been extended or enhanced to allow for SharePoint-specific content, which all lives inside of a site collection. Well, one or more site collections, and then within site collections we have individual sites. To refresh the scenario, we were thrown into the deep end as our mentor and advisor got poached by a competitor, so now we have to learn some SharePoint basics in a test environment. We've already handled all the prerequisite activities, and now we can look at actual specific SharePoint functionality, we do this by creating a site collection.

Managing Users and Permissions
In this module, we'll look at all the different ways you can use permissions and groups to restrict or allow access to content in your SharePoint environment. When you think about it, your SharePoint farm and your organizations in general are all designed to allow or restrict access to content based on things like clearance level, seniority, division, office, etc, so we'll look at how to configure authorization and manage access to content. We always want to give people just enough access, just enough permissions to do what they need to do for their job and nothing more. Sometimes administrators get lazy and give too many permissions to users, whether it's in a Windows context, from a windows admin perspective, or in a SharePoint farm context where you may not realize what a SharePoint user can do given the permissions you've granted, so it's important to stay on top of who gets what access to what resources in your SharePoint farm. You need to know different default permission levels at various levels of your farm, and also why you'd want to change those default permission levels or even create new permission levels. If your site design and overall SharePoint architecture design is good, you may not ever need to create custom permission levels, so we'll look at defaults, we'll look at exceptions in an upcoming demo.