Microsoft MTA: Networking Fundamentals Part 2

Part 2 of 2 in the Microsoft MTA: Networking Fundamentals series. This course is designed for those who have little to no experience in networking, but want to learn solid skills to build upon.
Course info
Rating
(117)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 21, 2012
Duration
3h 47m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Rating
(117)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Feb 21, 2012
Duration
3h 47m
Description

Part 2 of 2 in the Microsoft MTA: Networking Fundamentals series. If you're at all interested in computing technologies, you probably find yourself asking what is a network or what exactly is a protocol? Beginners in the computer world looking to actually start working with computer networks should be building up a technical background with computer networking standards. This course is designed for those who have little to no experience in networking, but want to learn solid skills to build upon.

About the author
About the author

Ed Liberman has worked in technology for over 20 years. He has been certified and instructing IT since 1998. He has helped thousands of people to get started or advance their careers in the IT industry.

More from the author
More courses by Ed Liberman
Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Name Resolution
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on name resolution. In this lesson we're going to start off by learning about the two different types of names that are used in Microsoft Computer Networking, and those are Host names and NetBIOS names. Then, we'll talk about resolving names to IP addresses, okay, so the idea of taking a name which is easy for humans to understand and remember, and converting them, or resolving them, to an IP address, which is what the computers use to communicate. And, then, we'll go through the literal name resolution process that a computer uses to resolve that easy to remember human name to an easily networkable computer IP address.

Routing
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on routing. In this lesson, we're going to start off by taking a look at routing tables, and seeing how they guide a computer, or really any network host on how to get a piece of information from one place to another. Then we'll talk about the idea of static versus dynamic routing, then we'll wrap things up by looking at a few different routing protocols that are in use today.

Remote Desktop Services (RDS)
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on Remote Desktop Services. In this lesson, we'll start out with an overview of Remote Desktop Services then we'll jump in and talk about what each of the individual role services are and what they're functionality would be in a Remote Desktop Services environment and then I'll quickly go through some of the changes that we saw with Windows Server 2008 R2 versus how things were with just Windows Server 2008.

Wireless Networking
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on wireless networking. In this lesson we're going to start off by talking about some of the benefits of using wireless networking. We'll look at the individual components of a wireless access point. We'll talk about placement of those access points. We'll go through some of the wireless networking standards. And we'll wrap things up by talking a little bit about securing a wireless network.

Network Security
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on network security. In this lesson, we are going to talk about firewalls, which is a very common term that most people have heard of and an obvious security component in networking. But we'll also talk about some other security devices as well. And we'll talk about network access security, which is where we determine who and what can even get access to our network. We'll talk about user authentication, device security, and then we'll wrap things up by going over some common security threats.

IPv6 Fundamentals
Welcome to TrainSignal. You're watching a lesson on IP version 6 Fundamentals. In this lesson, I want to put the emphasis on the fact that we are going to just go through the fundamentals. This is going to be a very high-level overview of IP version 6. And the reason why is because it is still not the predominant IP version being used. IP version 4 is still the most heavily used version that's out there and the one that you would be most involved with, especially just getting started as an IT professional. We're going to start off by talking about the disadvantages of IP version 4. And I'm going to clarify that to say it's kind of the so-called disadvantages because, really what it is, is it's what was looked at as the disadvantages of IPv4, although most of those have been solved without having to leave IPv4. But that's actually why IP version 6 was created, was because of these disadvantages. IPv6, well, it gave a solution to all of those problems. We'll look at both the disadvantages and then also the solutions that are provided. I'll then show you what an IPv6 address looks like and how it's formatted, we'll look at the different types of IP version 6 addresses, and then we'll wrap things up by talking to you about how IP version 6 can be compatible with IP version 4, how the two of them can work together.

Preparing for Your Networking Fundamentals (98-366) Exam
Welcome to TrainSignal! You're watching Preparing For Your Networking Fundamentals 98-366 Certification Exam. In this lesson, I'll take you through a basic exam overview. I'll also take you through the specific exam objectives, and I will tell you that the overview and the objectives is going to be material that's coming straight from Microsoft, but then I'll take you through a few of my own personal study recommendations, as well as maybe some exam preparation strategies. One thing I will emphasize going into this, very similar to way back at the beginning of this course, way back in the very first lesson where I gave you some tips on how to use the course, and I said that there is no one right way to do it, I will tell you that I have the exact same opinion about getting ready for a certification exam. I can give you some recommendations based upon successful personal experiences, and when I say successful personal experiences, I don't mean just my own test-taking, but other students that I have dealt with in the past, but it doesn't mean that you should follow every single thing I tell you, exactly the way I tell you, and expect that it's the perfect way to do it. No, you will need to figure out what you can take from this and use to your benefit, and where you may want to tweak my suggestions to fit your own personal study experience.