Implementing Windows Server 2016 DHCP

This course will teach you everything you need to implement DHCP in a Windows 2016 environment including installation, configuration, and management of the DHCP server role.
Course info
Rating
(17)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 11, 2017
Duration
2h 52m
Table of contents
Course Overview
Building the Lab for DHCP
Introduction to DHCP
Implementing IPv4 Addressing with DHCP Scopes and Options
DHCPv6 on Windows Server
Maintaining a DHCP Server
Migrating a DHCP Server
Deploying Highly-available DHCP Infrastructures
Description
Course info
Rating
(17)
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Apr 11, 2017
Duration
2h 52m
Description

DHCP is a staple of all networks and without it, IP Address management would be near impossible. In this course, Implementing Windows Server 2016 DHCP, you'll learn how to implement DHCP in a Windows Server 2016 environment. First, you'll learn how to install and configure a DHCP server including scopes, options, and server properties for IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. Next, you'll discover how to manage and troubleshoot DHCP including the DHCP database, event logs, and performing backups/restores. Finally, you'll explore how to migrate DHCP and implement fault tolerance in your environment. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the skills and knowledge of DHCP to implement and manage a DHCP implementation on Windows Server 2016.

About the author
About the author

Michael is a six-time Microsoft Most Valuable Professional, author, technical trainer, and community leader. Having been in the IT industry since the 90's, his experiences covers the gamut of Microsoft technologies, with his main focus being Windows Server, PowerShell and cloud technologies like AWS and Azure. Along with training, he has a passion for connecting people and building community in the IT Pro space. He is the current president and a founding member of The Krewe User Groups, Inc., a world-wide networking group for IT Pros and Developers.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone, my name is Michael Bender. Welcome to my course, Implementing Windows Server 2016 DHCP. I'm a Microsoft MVP, author of multiple Windows Server videos, and a Windows Server and PowerShell trainer at Madison College. Without DHCP, the life of an IT pro would be a lot more difficult. DHCP makes connecting a network easy and gets you on the golf course sooner. So this course is going to cover all the topics you need to implement DHCP on Windows Server 2016. Some of the major topics that we'll cover include how DHCP works, installing and configuring DHCP on Windows Server 2016, automating IP address allocation for IPv4 and IPv6 using DHCP, maintaining a DHCP server and implementing a highly-available DHCP infrastructure. By the end of the course, you'll have a solid foundation for implementing and managing DHCP in your organization on Windows Server 2016. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn DHCP with the Implementing Windows Server 2016 DHCP course at Pluralsight.

Building the Lab for DHCP
I've always said the only way to really learn a technology is to get your hands dirty and dive into it. So for this course on Windows Server DHCP, you'll need a robust environment so you can follow along. That's what we'll get into in this module. Building the lab for DHCP. If you don't plan to follow along on your own system, you can skip to the next module introduction to DHCP. To get started, I'll introduce you to the PowerShell Automated Lab Environment, or PowerShell AutoLab. Started by Pluralsight author Jason Helmick. It's a robust tool that will automatically build the lab scenario for this and other Pluralsight courses. Because the AutoLab is based on using Windows Hyper-V, you'll need to understand the requirements for this course for your lab environment. While Hyper-V isn't a requirement, it's the supported model that I'll be covering in this video and will be used throughout this course. Next, you'll be introduced to our lab server configuration for this course. I build a specific lab scenario to get the most out of AutoLab, and provide you the optimal learning experience for DHCP on Windows Server. Last, I'll walk you through setting up AutoLab and getting the lab environment built for this course. After completing this module, you'll be ready to follow along with all of the modules. So let's get to it.

Introduction to DHCP
In order for Windows clients or any client for that matter to be able to communicate on a TCP/IP network, they need an internet protocol, or IP address. The easy way to dole these addresses out automatically is using the dynamic host configuration protocol, or DHCP. And Windows server is a great way to manage DHCP. So that's what you'll learn in this course. Implementing Windows server 2016 DHCP. So your first module is introduction to DHCP. You'll learn how DHCP works, and why you want to use it for dynamic IP address allocation, along with the allocation of other options, like DNS servers, routers, and PXE boot options. Then, you'll learn how to install DHCP server on an active directory domain. You'll see how this is done remotely using the GUI, and using PowerShell. Last, you'll get a behind the scenes look at the DHCP server and its settings. This will establish the foundation you'll need as we cover the rest of the course on implementing DHCP on Windows server 2016. So let's get started.

Implementing IPv4 Addressing with DHCP Scopes and Options
Now it's time to get to work with DHCP on Windows Server 2016. Creating scopes on a DHCP server is how clients get IP addresses and other configuration information automatically. So it's the next step to get DHCP rolled out in your environment. So in this module, "Implementing IPv4 Addressing "with DHCP Scopes and Options", I'll dive into this feat first. First, I'll discuss DHCP scopes for IPv4. IPv6 scopes will come in a later module. And you'll learn about the different types of scopes, regular, super and multicast. Along the way you'll learn how to create these scopes in the GUI and using PowerShell. Then I'll introduce you to DHCP options. These allow you to provide clients additional configuration information like DNS servers, time servers and also the domain name using DHCP. And I'll finish off working with DHCP reservations and creating policies in DHCP. Both of these tools allow administrators more options for managing their DHCP environment and the clients using DHCP. This module's designed to get you up and running with DHCP so you can provide IP addresses to your network. The focus is going to be on how and why, so you'll be seeing a lot of demos you can follow on with in your lab environment.

DHCPv6 on Windows Server
While you may not be using it now, there will come a time when you need to deploy IPv6 into your environment, and DHCPv6 on Windows server will help you do some of the same things you've done for years with IPv6, allocate IP addresses and distribute optional configuration settings like DNS servers. So that's what you're going to learn in this module, DHCPv6 on Windows server. First, I'll refresh some of the basics about IPv6. Basic stuff like what an IPv6 address looks like, and how it works on the network. Then, you'll learn how IPv6 and DHCPv6 differ from DHCP for IPv4 addressing. While they are similar, there are important things you need to know about DHCPv6. Then, I'll dive into how clients obtain IPv6 addresses, so you can make decisions on how to implement DHCPv6 based on your network's setup. Finally, you'll get hands on with DHCPv6 on Windows server. I'll cover all of the same types of tasks we did with IPv4 including scope creation, configuration, settings options and creating reservations.

Maintaining a DHCP Server
DHCP is often one of those server roles that you set and forget, except when you need to modify scopes and options. While that may be the case, it's important you understand how to maintain and troubleshoot the DHCP server should issues arrive. So that's what you'll learn in this module, maintaining a DHCP server. First, I'll dive into the DHCP database, so you have an understanding of how it works, its components, and how to maintain it. Next, you'll see where to find information in the DHCP server that can help when you need to troubleshoot issues or simply see what's going on on your DHCP server. We'll look at things like the DHCP event logs, services, and Event Viewer. Then, I'll show you techniques for troubleshooting a DHCP client. And the module will finish with taking a look at how DHCP integrates with DNS. I'll cover DNS dynamic updates and name protection, and then show you how each is implemented on the DHCP server side, so let's get started.

Migrating a DHCP Server
There comes a time in the career of every IT pro when you have to move to a new operating system. With the introduction of Windows Server 2016, many companies are looking to make that leap. Often, it's the traditional services like DHCP that companies look to as their first jump into the new Microsoft OS. Migrating DHCP from one server to another has always been a straightforward task; and with the tools Microsoft provides, it's even easier. So that's what you'll learn in this module: Migrating a DHCP Server. While a short module, you'll learn the very important process of migrating a DHCP server role and its settings from one server to another. I'll discuss the planning processes for migration so you'll know what you need to look for before you migrate. Then you'll learn about the migration process and what to do after migration. Since this is a task you'll probably encounter, you'll learn about two sets of migration tools: export/import PowerShell commands and netsh. I'll perform an export/import on a DHCP server using both of these tools. This will give you all the resources you need to perform your own migration.

Deploying Highly-available DHCP Infrastructures
By its nature, DHCP has a form of high availability built in via the leasing process. That's as long as the lease is longer than your outages. That doesn't mean you don't want to implement higher availability. That is where DHCP failover comes in. An easy to use feature that's built in to Windows Server 2016. This module will cover building highly available DHCP infrastructures. First, I'll do a brief introduction to DHCP failover. Other than the requirements and modes there isn't a lot to talk about. It's a pretty straightforward feature in Windows Server 2016. Then I'll finish off showing you how to build a DHCP failover implementation using the load balance mode. This will provide you all you need to know to make your DHCP implementation rock solid. So let's get to it.