Exploring Android Studio

This course provides a detailed look into using Android Studio to develop Android applications.
Course info
Rating
(409)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 7, 2014
Duration
5h 39m
Table of contents
Introduction
Setting Up Android Studio
Migrating to Android Studio
Android SDK Tools
Creating Apps With Android Studio
Building and Debugging With Android Studio
Library Projects With Android Studio
Building a Release Package
Advanced Features
The Gradle Build System
The Android Gradle Plugin
Description
Course info
Rating
(409)
Level
Beginner
Updated
Oct 7, 2014
Duration
5h 39m
Description

Android Studio is the new Android application development IDE powered by the IntelliJ IDEA platform. The course will take you through downloading and setting up Android Studio on Windows, migrating to Android Studio from Eclipse, and developing Android applications and libraries. In this course, you will not only learn basic use of Android Studio, but also how to take advantage of its advanced features to provide more robust code and make you a more productive developer. Android Studio's new Gradle and Maven based build systems are covered so you know how to take advantage of the powerful build variant and dependency management they provide.

About the author
About the author

Larry Schiefer is the CTO and co-founder of HiQES, a mobile, embedded and application software development service company. He specializes in designing and developing device drivers, kernel software, BSP, and applications for Android, Linux, Windows, Windows Embedded, and various RTOS environments.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Setting Up Android Studio
Welcome back to the Exploring Android Studio course from Pluralsight. My name is Larry Schiefer, and in this module we will discuss the set up of Android Studio on your development machine. The purpose of this module is to walk you through the download and setup of Android Studio on a development machine. For our purposes, we'll be setting up Android Studio on a Windows 7, 64 bit machine. Android Studio is also available for Linux and Mac, though we will not be covering setup on those platforms. We will begin by discussing prerequisites and where to download the Android Studio package. After downloading, we'll then walk through how to perform a typical installation. Once installed, we may need to update our newly installed Android Studio. We will round out this module by discussing why it is important to do this, and how to do it. Along with this, we will also talk about potential dangers with doing updates to Android Studio.

Migrating to Android Studio
Welcome to the Migrating to Android Studio module, part of the Exploring Android Studio course from Pluralsight. I'm Larry Schiefer, and in this module I'll be covering how existing Android Eclipse users can migrate existing work, and I'll also provide some helpful info for Eclipse and Visual Studio users to ease their transition. In this module I will cover several topics relating to switching your development's environment from Eclipse or Visual Studio to Android Studio. First I will cover how to use the Eclipse ADT support to export an existing project for importing into Android Studio. As I've touched on before, Eclipse uses ant to build Android application packages. Android Studio, while capable of working with ant-based builds, instead uses a Gradle-based build system, which works differently. The ADT plugin provides us with the capability of prepping our project for Android Studio, if we want to use the same project structure as in Eclipse. Next I'll talk about how to take an existing Eclipse project and pull it into Android Studio as a new project. Unlike using the Eclipse export functionality, using this approach allows Android Studio to set the project up with the appropriate structure that is normally expects. I'll also go over the project structure changes made as part of the Android Studio import process, and some potential revision control system impact you may encounter. I'll wrap up this module by examining some common Eclipse and Visual Studio usage items, which are different but configurable in Android Studio.

Creating Apps With Android Studio
Hi, this is Larry Schiefer and I'd like to welcome you to the "Creating Apps With Android Studio" module, part of the Exploring Android Studio course from Pluralsight. In this module, I will walk you through the typical app development features used within Android Studio, creating a simple activity and fragment-based application. This module is going to be a predominantly demo-based module where I will walk you through core features of the Android Studio development suite. We will cover a large variety of topics including creating a new Android activity-based project, which will use fragments. The basic layout and usage of the Android Studio UI. Adding new Java files to our project and some of the great features available to you to ease the writing of Java. I'll walk you through working with Android Studio's XML graphical designer, as well as working on the XML at the text level. And, then we'll also talk about auto-completion and some helpful tools which make importing and creating references a lot simpler. This also will include a discussion about in-line documentation lookup capabilities.

Advanced Features
Welcome to the Advanced Development Features module of the Exploring Android Studio course from Pluralsight. I'm Larry Schiefer, and in this module we are going to look at some of the more advanced features available in Android Studio to help with our development. Over the last several modules, we walked through creating, running, and debugging usage for a simple activity and fragment-based project. The application we created will display running service information on our device. In doing so, we got to see many features and functions of Android Studio. However, there are even more available to help us with our work. I will not be able to touch on everything the tool chain has to offer, but I will cover some of the more interesting items, and ones which are targeted specifically at Android. Android Studio is built upon the IntelliJ platform, which is well known for its built-in refactoring capabilities. We'll take a look at refactoring a class and touch on some of the other refactoring features available. Android Studio includes a great analysis engine for examining Java code and XML. This capability will help you spot potential issues in your projects before heading to a release build. In addition to the Structure and To-Do panes, Android Studio includes other helpful features for navigating sources and projects. Using these features, we can quickly navigate our sources, as well as base classes. Besides the basic debug functionality we previously walked through, Android Studio provides additional Android-specific debug features. We will look at debugging remote processes, taking screen captures, analyzing heap usage, and performing traces. Android Studio includes support for version control integration via a set of plugins. It comes bundled with plugins for Git, Mercurial, SVN, and CVS. We will round out this module by taking a look at the Git integration and see how it can be leveraged for our project.