Scheduling in ARCHICAD

The Interactive Schedule Tool in ARCHICAD allows us to calculate and quantify the contents of your Building Information Models. This course will teach you the basics and more advanced formatting options available for Interactive Schedules.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 13, 2017
Duration
1h 21m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
Sep 13, 2017
Duration
1h 21m
Description

One of the main benefits to BIM is that it gives us the power to automate many of your outputs by building an intelligent 3D model. In this course, Scheduling in ARCHICAD, you'll learn about all areas of the interactive scheduling function in ARCHICAD. The Interactive Schedule Tool in ARCHICAD allows you to calculate and quantify the contents of your Building Information Models by accessing the geometric data, and information stored in each Building Element, presenting it in easily formatted tables. First, you'll explore interactive element schedules, along with component and surfacing schedules. Next, you'll dive into project indexes. Finally, you'll discover how to import and export data for scheduling. When you're finished with this course, you'll have the necessary knowledge to utilize all types of scheduling options available in ARCHICAD. Software required: ARCHICAD 21.

About the author
About the author

Over 10 years experience using both ARCHICAD and REVIT on a wide range of projects. Began on large scale commercial and institutional projects and moved into BIM Management and ARCHICAD Development for a large multidisciplinary firm. Provided technical support and training to 100s of ARCHICAD users in a strategic role for the software developers responsible for producing ARCHICAD and is now the dedicated ARCHICAD Manager for a large building company in Australia.

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Section Introduction Transcripts
Section Introduction Transcripts

Course Overview
Hi everyone. My name is Quinton Cooper, and welcome to my course on Interactive Schedules in ARCHICAD. Currently I'm the national training and development manager at an architectural practice working on some of the largest construction projects in the southern hemisphere. I've worked as a designer and BIM manager on a range of projects, and have provided ARCHICAD training to hundreds of users over the last decade. This course has been developed to explore all areas of the interactive scheduling function in ARCHICAD, and is ideal for people who understand modeling and documentation, but are looking to achieve more automation, and ultimately leverage the data in our building information models. Some of the major topics we will cover include interactive element schedules, component and surface schedules, project indexes, and also ways to export and import data for scheduling. By the end of this course you'll be comfortable with all types of scheduling options available in ARCHICAD. You'll be able to define scheduling criteria, select the relevant data fields, and exploit the full formatting capabilities of the interactive scheduling function. Modeling in ARCHICAD is easy, but extracting valuable BIM data from our model takes an extra level of knowledge. Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with the ARCHICAD interface and general modeling and documentation tasks. But beyond this, there are no pre-requisites for the course. I hope you'll join me on this journey to learn how to truly make the most of the information stored in our ARCHICAD models, with the Interactive Scheduling in ARCHICAD course, here at Pluralsight.

Interactive Schedules
Hello, and welcome to Interactive Schedules in ARCHICAD. My name's Quinton Cooper and I'll be taking your through the ins and outs of the interactive scheduling function in ARCHICAD 21. When looking at the interactive schedule, our premise is that we're trying to make the most of the information that we can store in our models. One of the big benefits of BIM is that when you produce a building model, the geometry then allows us to automatically produce 2D documentation, but we should be looking past this simple relationship between the model geometry and the 2D symbolic representation of the elements. Our virtual building models can actually act as intelligent repositories for information, which we can then automatically reference for different documents and output types. And the interactive schedule tool in ARCHICAD is one of the most effective means for capturing and then presenting this information. In ARCHICAD 21, there are three main types of interactive schedule. Element schedules, which allow us to call out information and quantify numbers of basic construction elements, objects, and doors and windows. Component schedules, which dig a little deeper and are designed to retrieve information relating to each component within a complex or composite element, such as composite floors or composite walls. And surface schedules, which can list the exposed surfaces contained in the model, and are useful for things like paint schedules and other applied finishes. By the end of this course, you should have an insight into the capability of all of the types of interactive schedules. You'll also be able to freely navigate and make use of the interactive schedule interface. You'll gain an understanding of criteria and fields for the creation of interactive schedules from scratch. We'll also explore project indexes, which share a common interface with interactive schedules, and you'll learn about different methods of importing and exporting data for various purposes. In this first module, we'll cover the overall concept behind this feature, get acquainted with the interface shared by all types of interactive schedule, and we'll look at some basic editing and initial formatting of an existing schedule.

Surface Schedules
Let's now turn our attention to Surface Schedules. So far, we've seen how Element Schedules relate to individual or assembled elements, while Component Schedules retrieve information relating to each component within a composite element, whereas Surface Schedules provide us with information on the surface or applied finishes of elements in our model. In this module, we'll explore the Surface Schedule functionality by creating a Paint or Finishes Schedule and then learn how exposed areas can be defined and quantified.

Project Indexes
Project indexes share the same interface as the interactive schedule feature in ARCHICAD, however, they're tied to with specific documentation-related functions, and have their own location in the project map. Project indexes can be created from multiple different categories, including views, usually for the purposes of auditing the filters applied to each view; layouts, so that we can create automatic tables of contents for our title and cover pages; drawings, which can be presented in lists that determines which drawings are placed on which layouts across a project; changes, and issue contents, and these last two categories form part of the revision management function in ARCHICAD. In this module, we'll learn how to work with project indexes, by creating a view index for basic auditing purposes, and then creating a layout index that provides us with an automatic table of contents for our cover pages.

Element Schedules: Advanced
Finally, let's take a look at a scheduling process that's more suitable for large-scale projects. The window schedule we produced earlier in the course is great for modest-sized buildings, but what if you're working on a job that has hundreds and hundreds of windows? So what I've done is take our window schedule using the interactive element schedule from before and apply this schedule to a 10-story building. You can see when we scroll through the schedule, it's a lengthy list, and it's not really that efficient to list hundreds of windows in this exact format. And what I tend to do on a larger-scale project is produce a type-based schedule that basically functions as a legend specifying what properties go into defining a window type, and then a very simple text-based list of each window and its type. This method also requires what I call an auditing or analysis schedule that helps me determine what types of windows are showing up across this large-scale project. So, in this final module, we'll create a window type auditing schedule to analyze the types of windows we have modeled in the project. We'll then create a simplified window type schedule that will act as our legend for documentation, and finally, create a text-based window list that simply identifies each window in our model and the type it references.